WHAT LIFE COULD LOOK LIKE ON MARS

Far fetched but still somewhat interesting:

A vision of what life on Mars and the moon could look like has been revealed in a series of incredible concept images.

The stunning shots reveal the 3D-printed homes and automated vehicles that could one day cover the surface of the planet.

They were created by the firm set up by designer Norman Foster, perhaps best known in the technology world for his work on Apple’s newly constructed ‘spaceship’ campus in Cupertino, California.

The Mars and lunar habitation pods will also be on display.

A virtual reality experience will allow festival-goers the chance to peer inside the proposed state-of-the-art habitation pods.

An example of a robotic architectural 3D-printing arm, of the type that would construct the habitats, will also be on show at the Goodwood Festival, creating different-shaped plastic objects to demonstrate its skills.

3D-printed homes, measuring 1,001 sq ft (93 sq m), would house up to four astronauts and be constructed using regolith – the loose soil and rocks found on the surface of Mars.

The dwellings would be created in three stages by pre-programmed, semi-autonomous robots before the arrival of any astronauts.

Firstly, semi-autonomous ‘Digger’ robots would select an appropriate site and dig a five foot (1.5 metre) deep crater in the regolith.

This would be followed by the delivery of inflatable modules which would sit within the crater to form the core of the settlement.

Medium-sized ‘Transporters’ would then move into position over the inflatable habitat modules to layer them into place.

The loose Martian soil would then be fused around the modules using microwaves – a similar principle used when 3D-printing – by several small ‘Melter’ robots.

This fused regolith would then create a permanent shield to protect the settlement from extreme radiation and temperatures.

The designers say that the clear separation of tasks among the robots would increase the likelihood of the mission’s success – if one robot failed, or a single module was damaged, there would be others that could fulfil the task in hand.

David Summerfield, head of studio at Foster + Partners, said: ‘We’re delighted that our design concepts for habitats on Mars and the Moon are taking centre stage at the FoS Future Lab.

‘It’s a fantastic opportunity for us to show how technology can enable us to create extraterrestrial settlements.

‘We hope visitors to the Goodwood Festival of Speed will come away from the display excited and enthused about the possibilities of the future and that it will inspire the next generation to reach for the stars.’

The moon and Mars colony concept originally won Foster + Partners second prize and the People’s Choice award in a Mars habitat competition organised by design institute America Makes and Nasa back in 2015.

The proposal outlines plans for a settlement constructed by a number of pre-programmed, semi-autonomous robots before the arrival of astronauts.

The 3D-printed homes, measuring 1,001 sq ft (93 sq m), would house up to four astronauts and be constructed using regolith – the loose soil and rocks found on the surface of Mars.

According to plans, the dwellings would be built in three stages.

Given the vast distance from the Earth and the issue of communication delays, construction would take place with minimal human input, relying instead on pre-programmed rules rather than closely defined instructions.

This, the designers say, would make the system more adaptable to change and able to cope with unexpected challenges on the surface of the planet.

Three different kinds of robots would be parachuted to the surface of Mars, with each performing a specialised task within what has been dubbed the large-scale Regolith Additive Construction (Rac) process.

Firstly, semi-autonomous ‘Digger’ robots would select an appropriate site and dig a five foot (1.5 metre) deep crater in the regolith.

This would be followed by the delivery of inflatable modules which sit within the crater to form the core of the settlement.

Medium-sized ‘Transporters’ would then move into position over the inflatable habitat modules to layer them into place.

The loose Martian soil would then be fused around the modules using microwaves – a similar principle used when 3D-printing – by several small ‘Melter’ robots.

This fused regolith would then create a permanent shield to protect the settlement from extreme radiation and temperatures.

In winter, temperatures near the poles can plummet to -125°C (-195°F). A summer day on Mars may reach up to 20°C (70°F) near the equator, but at night the temperature can plummet to around -73°C (-100°F).

The designers say that the clear separation of tasks among the robots would increase the likelihood of a successful mission – if one robot fails, or a single module is damaged, there would be others that could fulfil the task in hand.

The designers say that the living space would take human physiology and psychology into account.

‘Soft’ materials and enhanced virtual environments would help reduce the adverse effects of a relatively monotonous life on Mars.

The dome-shaped structures are also able to bear a maximum load of 3,734lbs (1,694kg) – double the weight of competing designs.

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1 Response to WHAT LIFE COULD LOOK LIKE ON MARS

  1. bogsidebunny says:

    Or the future could actually look like this:

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