SEATTLE, HOME OF MOONBATS AND GRASSHOPPER EATERS

Mariners fans ate 18,000 grasshoppers as snacks.

Do the math on this to figure how easily fools and their money are soon parted.

901 orders and 30.8 pounds. That’s less than TWO OUNCES per serving. About 3 or 4 oreos for comparison. For FOUR BUCKS!! Grasshoppers!!

grasshoppers
Attendees of Seattle Mariners baseball games ate a whopping 18,000 toasted grasshoppers in just the first three nights of their home opening games last week.

Safeco Field, the retractable roof baseball stadium of the Mariners, sold out of the baked insects each night, according to its official Twitter account.

Known as chapulines, the species of grasshoppers indigenous to Mexico, the bugs are wildly popular in Latin America, specifically regions of Mexico like Oaxaca as well as much of Central America. But the bugs have found their way up to the Northwest of the U.S. as insectivorous baseball fans ordered more than 900 cups of the chapulines (31 lbs.) — every single one the stadium had to offer.

“That’s more than the restaurant [that runs the stand], Poquitos, sells in a year,” a Mariners spokesperson told ESPN.

The team never anticipated the dish would be so desired.

“We don’t expect to sell a lot of them, but it’s a fun thing to offer and it’s an authentic,” Rebecca Hale, a Mariners representative, said prior to opening day, according to ESPN.

The Mariners called in an emergency order of grasshoppers for the weekend so they could help fulfill the apparent high demand. (RELATED: Pollster Eats Bugs On Live TV After Being Wrong About Trump Victory)

In the future, the stadium is placing a limit on how many orders it can sell per game.

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One Response to SEATTLE, HOME OF MOONBATS AND GRASSHOPPER EATERS

  1. bogsidebunny says:

    Not much changes. College kids in the 1920’s swallowed live gold fish and in the 1970’s chocolate covered ants and grasshoppers were gosh.

    The idiots never change, but the idiot food varies from generation to generation.

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