AFTERNOON EYE CANDY FOR THE 4TH

4th-chick1

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SEX RELATED NEWS BLOOPERS

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AND WHO SAYS THE FRUIT DOES NOT FALL FROM THE TREE?

They’ve got a soundtrack of a chimp drumming rhythmically on makeshift drums (kinda like the one below)

chimp-drumming

 
Reminds me if a distant cousin in our “urban jungles”:

drums-pail

Evidence that chimpanzees have a human-like musical ability has been spotted for the first time ever.

A remarkable audio clip recorded the moment that a chimp called Barney walked over to a makeshift drum and began beating.

The action, which took scientists completely by surprise, saw the chimp play a variety of drumbeats seemingly for fun, rather than communication.

The clip was recorded at the Biomedical Primate Research Centre in the Netherlands ten years ago, although the research paper on the incident has only now been published.

In January 2005, 24-year-old Barney walked away from his troop, picked up an overturned blue barrel and started drumming.

But what astonished scientists, led by Dr Valerie Dufour from the University of Strasbourg in France, was that he didn’t randomly bang on the drum, but maintained a rhythm and a tempo.

These are characteristics found in human music.

Barney was so spontaneous in his actions, playing on the drum for just five minutes, that the team were unable to find a camera in time to grab any video or images of him.

However, the primatologists were able to record his performance with a voice recorder, though.

‘I did not have a video or camera at the time so I asked a friend of mine to illustrate the posture of Barney while he was drumming,’ Dr Dufour told MailOnline.

However, he added that ‘it really contrasts with what chimpanzees generally do.’

‘This performance is probably the first evidence that our capacity to drum is shared with our closest relatives,’ the researchers wrote in their paper, published in Nature’s Scientific Reports.

In the full five-minute clip, which is included at the bottom of the paper, Barney moves between fast drumming and short bursts.

He hits a total of 685 drumbeats in 11 separate sequences.

Five of the sequences showed regularly beating, with an average tempo of 257 beats per minute.

‘This pace is close to human tempo for rhythmic music,’ the researchers said.

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LOL CATS

lol-catz3-106

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FROM THE POLITICAL CARTOON ARCHIVES

338pol-cartoons

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YOUR 4thOF JULY AFTERNOON MUSIC BREAK

MADISON RISING: “STAR SPANGLED BANNER”


H/T: KEN

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AND YOU WONDER WHY SOUTH AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN CAN’T GET THEIR SHIT TOGETHER?

You’ll need to click the picture below to be taken to a graphic depicting the number of slave ships, the size, the country that owned the ship and where in Africa they came.

Leftist twits here would have you believe we brought in millions. Quite the contrary:

slave-ships

Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. But as we discussed in Episode 2 of Slate’s History of American Slavery Academy, relative to the entire slave trade, North America was a bit player. From the trade’s beginning in the 16th century to its conclusion in the 19th, slave merchants brought the vast majority of enslaved Africans to two places: the Caribbean and Brazil. Of the more than 10 million enslaved Africans to eventually reach the Western Hemisphere, just 388,747—less than 4 percent of the total—came to North America. This was dwarfed by the 1.3 million brought to Spanish Central America, the 4 million brought to British, French, Dutch, and Danish holdings in the Caribbean, and the 4.8 million brought to Brazil.

This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. The dots—which represent individual slave ships—also correspond to the size of each voyage. The larger the dot, the more enslaved people on board. And if you pause the map and click on a dot, you’ll learn about the ship’s flag—was it British? Portuguese? French?—its origin point, its destination, and its history in the slave trade. The interactive animates more than 20,000 voyages cataloged in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database. (We excluded voyages for which there is incomplete or vague information in the database.) The graph at the bottom accumulates statistics based on the raw data used in the interactive and, again, only represents a portion of the actual slave trade—about one-half of the number of enslaved Africans who actually were transported away from the continent.

There are a few trends worth noting. As the first European states with a major presence in the New World, Portugal and Spain dominate the opening century of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, sending hundreds of thousands of enslaved people to their holdings in Central and South America and the Caribbean. The Portuguese role doesn’t wane and increases through the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, as Portugal brings millions of enslaved Africans to the Americas.
Inside the Slave Ship

History of American Slavery, Ep 2: The Atlantic slave trade during its heyday and the remarkable life of Olaudah Equiano.

In the 1700s, however, Spanish transport diminishes and is replaced (and exceeded) by British, French, Dutch, and—by the end of the century—American activity. This hundred years—from approximately 1725 to 1825—is also the high-water mark of the slave trade, as Europeans send more than 7.2 million people to forced labor, disease, and death in the New World. For a time during this period, British transport even exceeds Portugal’s.

In the final decades of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Portugal reclaims its status as the leading slavers, sending 1.3 million people to the Western Hemisphere, and mostly to Brazil. Spain also returns as a leading nation in the slave trade, sending 400,000 to the West. The rest of the European nations, by contrast, have largely ended their roles in the trade.

By the conclusion of the trans-Atlantic slave trade at the end of the 19th century, Europeans had enslaved and transported more than 12.5 million Africans. At least 2 million, historians estimate, didn’t survive the journey.

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