WHEN YOU HAVE LOTS OF MONEY….

And then lots more…….buy a motorhome that comes with its own garage:

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Ain’t This the Truth

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YET, STILL, LIBERALS LOVE TO SUCK AT THE ASSES OF THESE ILLEGAL SCUMBAGS

They say to make an omelette you need to break a few eggs so if we want to free ourselves of the criminal problem with illegals then these DACA folks need to go. All of them even if it means some good ones go, too.

Almost one-third of 214 U.S.-based MS-13 gang members arrested in an international sweep were invited into the United States by President Barack Obama’s “Unaccompanied Alien Children” policy.

The successful “Raging Bull’ sweep was announced by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Deputy Director Tom Homan in a joint press conference at ICE headquarters in Washington, D.C. on Thursday.

The operation is a “significant step towards dismantling and eradicating MS-13 in the United States and in El Salvador,” said Deputy Assistant Attorney General David Rybicki, the second-ranking official at DOJ’s Criminal Division. El Salvador police also arrested 53 gang members in El Salvador.

Sixteen of the 214 arrestees in the United States are U.S. citizens. Five were legal immigrants.

Ninety-three of 214 arrestees are charged with federal or state criminal offenses and will face prison time in the United States, said Derek Benner, the deputy executive associate director of the Homeland Security Investigations division.

The group of 214 include 193 illegal aliens, including 121 arrestees who will be deported but will not face criminal charges.

Sixty-four of the 193 illegals – nearly one in three – are would-be “dreamers” because they illegally crossed the border while claiming to be minors. Their unscreened claims to be children — not adults — won them the legal status of “Unaccompanied Alien Children,” which allowed them to claim federal aid and be released into the United States.

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YOUR AFTERNOON MUSIC BREAK (IN MEMORIAM)

The music world lost another great yesterday: Malcolm Young of AC/DC:

Malcolm Young, the rhythm guitarist and guiding force behind the Australian hard rock band AC/DC, has died. He was 64.
AC/DC announced the death on their official Facebook page and website Saturday. The posts did not say when or where Young died.

Young was diagnosed with dementia in 2014. A statement says he died peacefully with his family by his side.

Band representatives didn’t immediately return emails seeking comment. Young formed the group with his brother, Angus.

AC/DC were remarkably consistent for over 40 years with its mix of driving hard rock and bluesy shuffles, selling over 200 million albums, surviving the loss of its first singer and creating one of the greatest rock records ever in “Back in Black,” the world’s second best-selling album behind Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.”

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NATURE GIVES UP MORE BOUNTY

Silver and gold from hundreds of years ago:

A hoard of hidden medieval treasure, a fortune in gold and silver coins, was unexpectedly discovered during an excavation at the site of the famed medieval Abbey of Cluny in Saône-et-Loire, eastern France.

The medieval loot included 2,200 deniers (or pieces of silver) mostly issued by Cluny Abbey itself as well as 21 gold dinar coins, originally from the Middle East which were stored in a canvas bag.

The bounty also included a gold signet ring marked with the word “Avete” — a “word of greeting in a religious context” — as well as a folded 24-gram gold leaf and 21 Moroccan and Andalusian gold coins.

It is the first 12th century Cluniac treasure discovered in its original context during an archaeological excavation. It’s also the largest number of silver deniers discovered in one place and the only single hoard ever found to include Arabic coins, silver deniers and a signet ring. The intaglio stone is ancient Roman and engraved with the profile of a deity. Ancient engravings were prestige items and often re-used as signet rings by the medieval elite.

Also of note is the survival of fragments of the original bag the hoard was stashed in. Fragments of it are still attached to some of the coins. There is also a surviving piece of tanned animal hide which was tied around the bundle of 21 gold dinars minted between 1121 and 1131 in Spain and Morocco during the reign of Almoravid sultan Ali Ben Youssef (1106-1143).

In the 16th century the Abbey of Cluny was sacked by Hugenots and never really recovered. At the time of the French Revolution, the monastic order was dissolved and under Napoleon the abbey itself was demolished and used as a quarry. Today only one of its eight grand towers still stands, which is why archaeologists continue to excavate it, 90 years after the first archaeological explorations of the site began.

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MORNING EYE CANDY

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SERVES YOU LIBERAL CALIFORNICATORS RIGHT

Huge bunker built at homeless camp where over 1,000 bikes, a gun, etc were found.

The residents have complained about their neighborhood being over run with homeless.

Tough shit!

You voted for the fuckers in office that allow this crap to take place.

Live with it.

The makeshift bunker beneath a recently-displaced Fountain Valley homeless encampment was big enough for a grown person to stand inside, replete with wood-paneled walls and a support beam, and accessible only via a small hatch camouflaged to blend in with its dirt surroundings.

The half-loaded .357 Magnum found near the same camp, along the Santa Ana River, contained three empty shell casings – meaning it had been fired.

And the 1,000 bicycles discovered hidden away in the flood-control channel’s dark tunnel system in Santa Ana, two miles north of the encampment, could suggest a large-scale theft ring.

Orange County sheriff’s deputies and public employees said they uncovered unusual and dangerous conditions in the recently cleared homeless camps on the riverbed in Fountain Valley and in portions of the river to the north. The findings, they said, posed public safety risks and indicated that the area was rife with crime.

“It just backs up the data that we’ve collected, which says there is a significant criminal element in the homeless encampments,” sheriff’s Lt. Jeff Puckett said.

The sheriff’s department provided no evidence linking the gun or bicycles to any individuals living in the Fountain Valley encampment but said the investigation is ongoing.

County employees discovered the bunker Wednesday, Nov. 16, as part of a cleanup effort after the county forced about 200 people to move out of the area five days earlier.

The cavern’s hatch was concealed beneath a thin layer of dirt. But once workers opened the plywood trapdoor, they found a series of wooden steps that took them six feet underground, to a reinforced, 10-foot-by-10-foot room big enough for a 5-foot-7-inch person to stand upright.

Officials don’t know how the bunker was built or who used it.

“We’re not sure what (the room) was for – probably some type of living situation,” Puckett said. “It’s nothing I’ve ever seen before.”

The county moved to clear the encampment, located between Warner and Edinger avenues, following months of complaints from neighbors that homeless people were trespassing, harassing residents and stealing from nearby homes. Some of the discoveries, officials said, add credence to those neighbors’ complaints and fears.

The gun, for example, is of interest to investigators. Puckett declined to say where the gun was found, though he indicated it was discovered a week ago. He also couldn’t discuss if the gun was used in any open crimes or other details of the investigation.

The bicycle collection also is being investigated.

Though makeshift chop shops where bicycles are taken apart, cleaned and reassembled are a common sight along several portions of the lengthy riverbed homeless encampments, Pucket said he’d never seen a collection as big as the 1,000 bicycles hidden in Santa Ana. The bikes were found just south of the river’s Fairview Street overpass.

Puckett wouldn’t speculate how many of the bikes were stolen, citing the ongoing investigation, saying “common sense would dictate that if you have 1,000 bikes in a tunnel… some of them were stolen.”

After Public Works employees discovered the stockpile two weeks ago, workers labored to drag the bicycles out of the tunnels before hauling them off in four large trucks to a nearby storage yard. Puckett said at some point the department probably will let the public look at the cache in an effort to reunite lost or stolen bikes with their owners.

Fountain Valley police Sgt. Kham Vang said the city hadn’t recently experienced an increase in bike thefts, though he noted that most bicycle thefts go unreported.

But neighborhood residents offer a different story, saying they’ve noticed an increase in bike thefts and other crimes.

“I’m not surprised at any of these things they found, other than the bunker,” said Kris Gillan, who owns a condo near the riverbed. “This is why we tried and tried to get (sheriff’s deputies and Fountain Valley) out there, but nothing was done for a long, long time.”

She said a neighbor’s bike was stolen recently off a patio, and that she regularly saw people lurking in the complex and looking inside parked cars. As the encampment grew, she said, so did crime.

“I feel safer now that they’re gone,” Gillan said.

“But how did it get this bad? I hope the county has learned their lesson.”

Earlier this year, the sheriff’s department and local police departments disputed which agency had jurisdiction over portions of the riverbed, leaving some areas largely unpatrolled. That changed in September, when the sheriff’s department began patrolling the Santa Ana River encampments, making hundreds of arrests. And during the past week, the county began enforcing a public-access curfew to the river trail, hiring private security guards to help enforce it.

Supervisor Todd Spitzer said Thursday that the bicycles and the recovered gun were proof that “the riverbed encampments are a serious public safety concern and the county must continue to clear out these trespassers.”

But as the county worked last Friday to clear the Fountain Valley encampment, many homeless people said they didn’t know where they would move. Social service workers said the action will simply push some people back to the streets of adjacent cities and force others to move to the already-crowded riverbed encampments in Anaheim and Orange, where neighbors and businesses also are complaining.

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